Week 10: It's All In!

We are taking a look at how things are doing in the garden this week. Plus, pulling back the curtain to get to know the people behind the blog. Also, now that your veggies are all in, let's explore permaculture with a feature film.


A look at the Garden


We have planted all of our veggies in the garden now and we feel comfortable recommmening that you can too. Here are some snapshots of how things are doing in our garden. Some are thriving, others facing some challenges - as you would expect. The variable weather and other conditions will favor some crops while other crops will have issues. That's just the way it is.

Our brassicas are growing slowly and getting a bit munched by slugs (left). This is often a problem when you have a good mulch layer on where they can hide. It's time for us to spread some Sluggo, an organic control for slugs, or to break out the beer. Placing a pie plate of beer near the plants overnight is a great way to catch and remove slugs to knock the population down.


Our carrots have germinated nicely this year (right). We'll keep them well watered with the drip tape, and mulch them when they get a bit bigger. Until then it's careful weeding.

The lettuce is hitting its stride now and we are picking it nightly for dinner (left and center). We have already planted a new batch from seed so that when this patch is done there will be more coming on. That's succession planting!


Our beets and chard (right) are ready to be thinned to give each plant enough room to grow. Those thinnings will go into our salad tonight!

Our potatoes are poking up ! (left) When they get a bit taller we will hill them up to create deeper underground stems - because that's where the spuds form.


Garlic is planted in November so, with well-developed roots, it can leap ahead of everything else in the spring. Next month it will flower. We want all the energy to go to the bulb, not to making seeds, so we cut the flowers off and use them to make a delicious pesto. The flowers are called scapes. Look for them in the markets.


Our champagne currants are also starting to form (right). Next month we will be picking these strings of pearls and popping them in our mouths (below).



So Who Writes This Blog Anyways?


We thought we'd introduce ourselves this week, for those of you who don't know us yet.


This is Jacob. He's a farmer, educator, and community organizer who loves getting people involved in building the resilient local food systems that happy, healthy communities need moving forward. Right now this means oyster farming on Cape Cod and working with the New Hampshire Food Alliance organizing people around producing more local food while adapting to climate change. He has also lived and learned in Vermont's slate valley and taught about food systems in Eleuthera in The Bahamas. He is a co-writer of Resilient Roots blog and helping us grow and reach more people.


Chief Editor and Executive Director of Resilient Roots is Kristie.

Her background is in ecology, environmental management and farming/gardening. Kristie is a Certified Permaculture Designer, garden educator, and has worked on a range of projects in the public and private sectors. She has years of experience in creating food forests, backyard veggie gardens, implementing educational school programs & adult gardening classes as well as volunteering on many organic farms and permaculture projects around the world.


Greta is joining us this summer to co-write the blog. She is currently studying at Vassar College majoring in Environmental Studies where her interests include local food systems, plant biology, social and environmental resilience, and combating environmental racism. She has been the manager of a local rooftop garden restaurant operation and in the last two years become involved in aquaculture on Cape Cod.






Dipping a Toe In Permaculture


Finally, we wrap this week up with a recommendation. As you tend your veggie garden, why not dream a bit about adding perennials or exploring permaculture in your life. To get the ideas flowing, here are two resources we tell new permaculture design clients to familiarize themselves with in preparation for our journey together:





1.) Read Gaia's Garden by Toby Hemenway (available to buy from your local bookstore, or find an e-book from your local library!) This is a wonderful introduction to the foundational ideas and skills of permaculture. Hemenway covers a lot of ground but explains things in very easy to understand terms making this an enjoyable read for novices and experts alike.





2.) Watch INHABIT: A Permaculture Perspective (now offered for free streaming). This is a truly inspirational film that takes you all over the U.S. to see people putting permaculture into practice in many different contexts and scales. It's a wonderful chance to see what life on this planet could look like with a different lens. The makers of the film wanted to show it to as many people as possible, saying:


"We created INHABIT in 2015 to help envision what a more resilient world could look like. The COVID-19 pandemic is causing a global shutdown of our fragile economy and it is a critical moment to reflect on the broken systems that run our world. The goal of this film is to inspire and empower people and we hope by offering the film for free it will have a greater effect. "


We highly recommend you watch this film!


Coming Up:


We will be looking at the best tools for weeding, creating a watering schedule, and what are those pretty yellow butterflies?


After next week we will be going to a different schedule of every other week. We will be focussing on what maintenance should you be doing in the garden and what pests should you be looking out for, as well as, what can you make with all this amazing produce.


Garden Extras:

We bumped into this newly released app for growing vegetables that we thought we would let you know about: From Seed to Spoon. There is a plethora of information stuffed into the app that could be at your fingertips when you're in the garden and not near your computer. It may save you a trip into the house to get some details when your planting, etc. It has great reviews so we thought we would pass it on. It's free for now.




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